Real-life reporting: Authentic journalism assessment, student motivation and active learning

Caroline Graham, Bond University

Document Type Book Chapter

Citation only

Graham, C. (2012). Real-life: Authentic journalism assessment, student motivation and active learing. In K. Wood, D. Knight & S. Kinash (Eds.) Scholarship of teaching and learning at Bond: Fostering early career research, vol. 2, (pp 94- 105). Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia: Office of Learning and Teaching, Bond University.

Access the publisher's website.

2012 HERDC submission. FoR code: 130103

© Copyright Office of Learning and Teaching, Bond University, 2012

Abstract

There is a substantial body of literature detailing the advantages of experiential and authentic learning opportunities, and evidence that they are common within tertiary journalism education. However, research about practical journalism assessment is limited (Steel, Carmichael, Holmes, Kinse & Sanders, 2007). This paper uses Gulikers, Bastiaens and Kirscher's (2004) Five-Point Framework for Authentic Assessment to design a practical body of assessment for a Journalism Research Methods class. Although the level of support first-year journalism students required impacted on the fidelity of the exercise, students' reflections on the experience support scholars' claims that authentic and experiential assessment opportunities increase motivation and prompt students to play a more active role in learning.

 

This document has been peer reviewed.