Bond University
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Abstract

In Techniques for Teaching Law, Hess and Friedland express their enthusiasm for “Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education” as valuable guidelines for legal educators. 1. Encouraging student-staff contact; 2. Encouraging cooperation among students; 3. Encouraging active learning; 4. Giving prompt feedback; 5. Emphasising effective time management; 6. Communicating high expectations and 7. Respecting diverse talents and ways of learning. As committed legal educators, the authors of this article are guided by these principles in their teaching practice and believe that “while traditional legal education emphasised the acquisition of knowledge or ‘cognitive learning’, today professional legal education must seek to achieve other goals”. If Law graduates are to be equipped with lifelong skills and attributes then these goals must include the growth of interpersonal and communication skills in context throughout the undergraduate degree.

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