Title

Responsible international citizenry in the Asian century: Why failure to meet international obligations adversely affects Australian national interests

Date of this Version

2015

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Details

Citation only

Ireland-Piper, D. (2015). Responsible international citizenry in the Asian century: Why failure to meet international obligations adversely affects Australian national interests. In J. Farrar, M. Hiscock, & V. I. Lo (Eds.), Australia's trade, investment and security in the Asian century (pp. 289-309). Singapore: World Scientific.

Access the publisher

2015 HERDC submission

© Copyright, World Scientific Publishing Co Pte Ltd, 2015

ISBN

9789814632867

Abstract

If Australia is to secure its financial and security interests in the Asian century, then it must build effective working relationship in the Asia-Pacific. To do so, Australia must build familial and not merely transactional relationship in Asia. In turn, this requires Australia to present as a responsible international citizen. This image of responsible citizenry, however, is difficult to achieve when the Australian Constitution permits race-based laws and Australia’s approach to regional asylum seeker management may violate international law. This is because the hypocrisy inherent in non-compliance impedes Australia's capacity to build meaningful relationship in the Asian region. in that context, this chapter first considers race-based laws in an Australian constitutional law paradigm, and then goes on to identify some of the flaws in Australia's asylum seeker policies. it does so with a view to assess each for compliance with some of Australia's obligations under international law.

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This document has been peer reviewed.