Title

Continuing the internationalisation debate: Philosophies of legal education, issues in curriculum design and lessons from skills integration

Date of this Version

1-1-2014

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Details

Citation only

Wolski, B. (2014). Continuing the internationalisation debate: Philosophies of legal education, issues in curriculum design and lessons from skills integration. In W. Van Caenegem & M. Hiscock (Eds.), The internationalisation of legal education: The future practice of law (pp.70-91). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd.

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Copyright © William van Caenegem and Mary Hiscock, 2014

2014 HERDC submission

ISBN

9781783474530

Abstract

.

The legitimate goals of legal education, and the demands made on an already crowded curriculum, are overwhelming. Commentators and policymakers point to the importance of teaching 'core knowledge', law in context (with an interdisciplinary mix of subjects such as economics, history, dispute resolution, business and management), generic skills, specific legal skills, ethics and values. More recently, some commentators have argued that the curriculum should be 'internationalised' in order to prepare students for increasingly 'globalised' legal practice. According to some of these commentators, there is no question but that we should internationalise the curriculum, and the real issue now is how we should go about doing it. In as much as these commentators suggest that there is a pressing need for curricula reform to accommodate external drivers such as globalisation, they may be correct. But if they are suggesting that all law schools and all law teachers are on board with the need for change, then they are being overly optimistic. The debate about internationalisation of the curriculum is far from over.

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This document has been peer reviewed.