Title

Juries and Social Media: A Report Prepared for the Victorian Department of Justice

Date of this Version

6-1-2013

Document Type

Research Report

Publication Details

Citation only

Johnston, J., Keyzer, P., Holland, G., Pearson, M., Rodrick, S., & Wallace, A. (2013). Juries and Social Media: A Report Prepared for the Victorian Department of Justice. Melbourne: Standing Council on Law and Justice.

Access the publisher

© Copyright The Standing Council on Law and Justice, 2013

Abstract

Introduction: It is a fundamental principle of law that an accused has a right to a fair trial. An incident of this right is that information relating to prior convictions of an accused should not be made available to the jury as it may bias their verdict. In our legal system, this principle has traditionally been underpinned by the common law offence of sub judice contempt of court. It is also reinforced by legislation, in each State and Territory, which makes it an offence for a juror to enquire about a person who is a party to a trial or any matter relevant to a trial.