Title

The liberalization of the regulatory structure of complementary and alternative medicine: Implications for consumers and professions

Date of this Version

1-1-2012

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Details

Citation only

Weir, M. (2012). The liberalization of the regulatory structure of complementary and alternative medicine: Implications for consumers and professions. In J. Adams, G.J. Andrews, J. Barnes, A. Broom, & P. Magin (Eds.). Traditional, Complementary and Integrative Medicine: An International Reader (pp. 220-227). London: Palgrave-Macmillan

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2012 HERDC submission. FoR code: 180199

© Copyright Palgrave-Macmillan

ISBN

9780230232655

Abstract

Over the past 30 years there has been a rapid development in the regulatory structure for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in many western countries. Focusing primarily on Australia (with reference and in comparison to Canada and the United States), this chapter argues that the reform of the regulatory structure since the 1970s, a development driven by economic imperatives among a number of complex factors (for discussion of wider societal changes linked to CAM, see Chapters 1 and 2), has resulted in CAM no longer being subject to overly restrictive legislative restrictions. The implications of this liberalization of regulatory structure for consumers, CAM therapists, orthodox medicine and patients are also considered.

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This document has been peer reviewed.