Title

What we think affects how we behave: The relationship between beliefs and practice in psychologists' detection of malingering

Date of this Version

11-27-2008

Document Type

Conference Paper

Publication Details

Citation only

Yoxall, J., Bahr, M. & Barling, N. (2008). What we think affects how we behave: The relationship between beliefs and practice in psychologists' detection of malingering. Paper presented at the 7th Australian Conference on Personality and Individual Differences, 27-29 November, Gold Coast, Australia

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© Copyright The Authors, 2008

Abstract

Malingering is the deliberate fabrication or gross exaggeration of symptoms in order to gain a specific outcome. Whilst the definition of this form of deception has remained relatively unchanged for over a century, the reasons that some individuals engage in malingering is less clear. Whilst several explanatory models of malingering were proposed by Rogers (1990) nearly 20 years ago, the relationship between psychologists’ beliefs about malingering and their assessment practice has yet to be explored. The current paper presents data from a recent Australian study, which explored differences in Australian psychologists’ beliefs about malingering and the influence of such beliefs on their assessment behaviour.

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