Title

Campaigning for a seat on the UN Security Council: a middle power reflection on the role of public diplomacy

Date of this Version

12-1-2011

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Details

Published version

Byrne, C. (2011). Campaigning for a seat on the UN Security Council: a middle power reflection on the role of public diplomacy. CPD Perspectives on public diplomacy, paper 10, 1-43.

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© Copyright Figueroa Press, a division of the USC Bookstore, 2011. All rights reserved.

ISBN

9780182123360

Abstract

For active middle power states like Australia, securing a seat on the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) is indeed a ‘prize to be pursued with vigour’.1 In today’s complex and interdependent world, pursuit of this prize requires more than just intense diplomatic lobbying within the corridors of the UN in New York. Successful election to the UNSC turns upon the broad notions of international reputation and image. The campaign itself is a significant exercise in the engagement and persuasion of wider international audiences who have interests in and expectations of the UNSC candidate nations. Drawing in particular upon the past and current UNSC aspirations of Australia, this article examines how and when middle power states might effectively apply the wide-lens of public diplomacy alongside traditional diplomatic practice to improve the likelihood of election to the UNSC, but also to maximise soft power outcomes of the campaign well beyond the election timeframe and result.

 

This document has been peer reviewed.