Title

The direct and indirect benefits of dispositional mindfulness on self-esteem and social anxiety

Date of this Version

3-1-2011

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Details

Citation only.

Rasmussen, M. K., & Pidgeon, A. M. (2011). The direct and indirect benefits of dispositional mindfulness on self-esteem and social anxiety. Anxiety, Stress and Coping, 24 (2), 227-233.

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2011 HERDC submission. FoR code: 170106

© Copyright Taylor & Francis, 2010

ISSN

1061-5806

Abstract

The current study investigated relationships between dispositional mindfulness, self-esteem, and social anxiety using self-report measures. Correlational data were collected from 205 Australian undergraduate students who completed the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS). Mindfulness significantly predicted high levels of self-esteem and low levels of social anxiety. Mediation analysis supported the role of self-esteem as a partial mediator between mindfulness and social anxiety. Clinical implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

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This document has been peer reviewed.