Title

Behavioral consistency, the homology assumption and the problems of induction

Date of this Version

2009

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Details

Interim status: Citation only.

Petherick, W., & Ferguson, C. (2009). Behavioral consistency, the homology assumption and the problems of induction. In W. Petherick (Ed.), Serial crime: Theoretical and practical issues in behavioral profiling (pp. 39-66). Burlington, USA: Elsevier Academic Press.

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2009 HERDC submission. FoR code: 1602

© Copyright 2009, Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

ISBN

978-0-12-374998-7

Abstract

Extract:
The ultimate goal of profiling is to identify the major behavioral and personality characteristics to narrow the suspect pool. Inferences about offender characteristics can be accomplished deductively, based on the analysis of discrete offender behaviors established within a particular case. They can also be accomplished inductively, involving prediction based on abstract offender averages from group data (these methods were detailed extensively in Chapter 2; see also Petherick & Turvey, 2008a). As discussed, these two approaches are by no means equal.

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This document has been peer reviewed.