Objective and subjective benefits of a community-based, older adult multi-component exercise programme

Justin Keogh, Bond University
John Rice, Auckland University of Technology
Denise Taylor, Auckland University of Technology
Andrew Kilding, Auckland University of Technology

Document Type Journal Article

Citation only

Keogh, J. W., Rice, J., Taylor, D., & Kilding, A. (2014). Objective and subjective benefits of a community-based, older adult multi-component exercise programme. Journal of Primary Health Care, 6(2), 114–122.

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© Copyright, Journal of Primary Health Care , 2014

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Abstract

Most exercise studies for older adults have been university- or hospital-based. Little is known about the benefits and factors influencing long-term participation in community-based exercise programmes, especially in New Zealand. AIM: To quantify the objective benefits, participant perceptions and retention rates of a New Zealand community-based exercise programme for adults (60 years or older). METHODS: Study 1 involved assessing the benefits of 12 weeks' training on a convenience sample of 62 older adults commencing the never2old Active Ageing programme. Study 2 assessed the perceptions of 150 current participants on a variety of programme components that could act as barriers or facilitators to continued engagement. Study 3 assessed the retention rates of 264 participants in the programme over a two-year period. RESULTS: Significant improvements in many physical functional scores were observed in Study 1 (5-30 percentile points; p

 

This document has been peer reviewed.