Title

Shared decision making: What do clinicians need to know and why should they bother?

Date of this Version

7-1-2014

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Details

Published Version.

Hoffmann, T. C., Légaré, F., Simmons, M. B., McNamara, K., McCaffery, K., Trevena, L. J., Hudon, B., Glasziou, C., & Del Mar, C. B. (2014). Shared decision making: What do clinicians need to know and why should they bother? The Medical Journal of Australia, 201(1), 35-39.

Access the journal

© Copyright, Medical Journal Australia, 2013

NHMRC Project Grant GNT0527500 & GNT1044904

ISSN

1326-5377

Abstract

Shared decision making is a consultation process where a clinician and patient jointly participate in making a health decision, having discussed the options and their benefit ts and harms, and having considered the patient’s values, preferences and circumstances. Shared decision making is not a single step to be added into a consultation, but can provide a framework for communicating with patients about health care choices to help improve conversation quality. It is a process that can be used to guide decisions about screening, tests and treatments. It can also be thought of as a mechanism for applying evidence with an individual patient through personalising the clinical decision. Although, to date, most research about shared decision making has focused on medical practitioners, it is relevant to clinicians of all disciplines, including nursing and allied health.

 

This document has been peer reviewed.