Date of this Version

3-9-2017

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Details

Accepted Manuscript

Henwood, T., Hassan, B., Swinton, P., Senior, H., & Keogh, J. (2017). Consequences of sarcopenia among nursing home residents at long-term follow-up. Geriatric Nursing, doi:10.1016/j.gerinurse.2017.02.003

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Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Distribution License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

ISSN

1528-3984

Abstract

The consequences of and transition into sarcopenia with long-term survival was investigated in the nursing home setting. Eligible residents from 11 nursing homes were followed-up 18-months after their assessment for sarcopenia using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People criteria, with other demographic, physical and cognitive health measures collected. Of the 102 older adults who consented at baseline, 22 had died and 58 agreed to participate at follow-up, 51.7% of whom had sarcopenic. Sarcopenia at baseline was associated with a depression (p < .001), but not mortality, hospitalization, falls or cognitive decline at follow-up. Age was the strongest predictor of mortality (p = .05) with the relative risk of death increasing 5.2% each year. The prevalence of sarcopenia is high and increases with long-term survival in end-of-life care. However, the risk of sarcopenia-related mortality is not as great as from increasing age alone.

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This document has been peer reviewed.