Title

Smoke and mirrors: unanswered questions and misleading statements obscure the truth about organ sources in China

Date of this Version

5-4-2016

Document Type

Response or Comment

Publication Details

Citation only

Rogers, W. A., Tray, T., Fiatarone Singh, M. A., Bridgett, M., Bramstedt, K., & Lavee, J. (2016, in press). Smoke and mirrors: unanswered questions and misleading statements obscure the truth about organ sources in China. Journal of Medical Ethics.

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Copyright © 2016 by the BMJ Publishing Group Ltd & Institute of Medical Ethics.

ISSN

0306-6800

Abstract

This response refutes the claim made in a recent article that organs for transplantation in China will no longer be sourced from executed prisoners. We identify ongoing ethical problems due to the lack of transparent data on current numbers of transplants in China; implausible and conflicting claims about voluntary donations; and obfuscation about who counts as a voluntary donor. The big unanswered question in Chinese transplant ethics is the source of organs, and until there is an open and independently audited system in China, legitimate concerns remain about organ harvesting from prisoners of conscience.

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This document has been peer reviewed.