Title

Individual differences in trait anxiety and goal-commitment predict updating efficiency on the reading span task

Date of this Version

7-29-2016

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Details

Citation only

Edwards, E. J., Edwards, M. S., & Lyvers, M. (2016). Individual differences in trait anxiety and goal-commitment predict updating efficiency on the reading span task. Motivation and Emotion, 1-10.

Access the journal

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

ISSN

0416-7239 print, 1573-6644 online

Abstract

According to attentional control theory (ACT; Eysenck et al. in Emotion 7(2):336–353, 2007) anxious individuals recruit motivation on demanding tasks, which helps prevent performance shortfalls. We used a quasiexperimental design to examine the relationship between trait anxiety (operationalised using questionnaire scores), situational stress (manipulated using ego threat instructions) and motivation (indexed using a self-report goalcommitment scale) in predicting effectiveness (accuracy) and efficiency (accuracy divided by RT) on the reading span task. After controlling for depression, the variables were not related to effectiveness; however there was a significant trait anxiety 9 goal-commitment interaction on reading span efficiency. Higher trait anxiety predicted better efficiency at higher goal-commitment, and poorer efficiency at lower goal-commitment, and these relationships were independent of situational stress. Results are interpreted in terms of ACT.

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This document has been peer reviewed.