Title

Attitudes towards anorexia nervosa: Volitional stigma differences in a sample of pre-clinical medicine and psychology students

Date of this Version

2-29-2016

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Details

Citation only

Bannatyne, A. J., & Stapleton, P. B. (2016, in press). Attitudes towards anorexia nervosa: Volitional stigma differences in a sample of pre-clinical medicine and psychology students. Journal of Mental Health.

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© Copyright, 2016 Taylor & Francis

ISSN

0963-8237

Abstract

Background:

Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a highly stigmatised condition, with treatment often involving multidisciplinary care. As such, understanding and comparing the attitudes of emerging mental health and medical professionals towards AN, within the content of sex-based differences, is pertinent to facilitate the development of targeted stigma interventions.

Aims:

Examine the volitional stigmatisation of AN in emerging medical and mental health professionals.

Method:

Participants (N = 126) were medical (n = 41) and psychology students (n = 85) who completed a range of attitudinal outcome measures (e.g. Causal Attributions Scale, Eating Disorder Stigma Scale, Opinions Scale, Characteristics Scale and Affective Reaction Scale).

Results:

Across both disciplines, men were found to exhibit significantly higher eating disorder (ED) stigma, considered AN to be a more trivial and weak illness, and attributed greater levels of blame and responsibility to AN sufferers. Men also had significantly lower biogenetic causal attributions. Compared with psychology students, medicine students exhibited slightly greater anticipation of negative reactions in response to AN, obtained higher selfish/vain scores and considered sociocultural factors to contribute “a lot” in the development and maintenance of AN.

Conclusions:

Overall, results indicate interventions aimed at improving ED mental health literacy are needed, specifically targeting males and potentially medical students.

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This document has been peer reviewed.