Title

Body dissatisfaction and surveillance, exercise frequency, depression and self-esteem in a university population

Date of this Version

5-1-2014

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Details

Citation only

Stapleton, P., & Dzodz, N. (2014). Body dissatisfaction and surveillance, exercise frequency, depression and self-esteem in a university population. The International Journal of Healing and Caring, 14(2), 1-12.

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© Copyright, IJHC, 2014

2014 HERDC submission

ISSN

1538-1080

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to explore the relationship between body dissatisfaction and body surveillance, exercise frequency, depression and self-esteem in 121 university students from various Australian tertiary institutions aged between 17 to 45 years old population. This study also aimed to observe gender differences in the experience of body dissatisfaction. Inconsistent with previous research and the present hypothesis, no significant relationship was found between body dissatisfaction and exercise frequency or body surveillance. However, a significant relationship was found between body dissatisfaction and depression, as well as with self-esteem. Gender was also found to significantly predict body dissatisfaction, with females reporting a higher degree of body dissatisfaction than males. Results of the current study indicate that interventions and resilience programs for eating disorders and those who are at risk would benefit from focusing on younger student females, particularly those who report lower self-esteem, higher depression and body dissatisfaction.

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This document has been peer reviewed.