Title

Reflecting, tinkering, and tailoring: Implications for theories of information system design

Date of this Version

1-1-2011

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publication Details

Citation only.

Hovorka, D., & Germonprez, M. (2011). Reflecting, tinkering, and tailoring: Implications for theories of information system design. In H. Isomaki & S. Pekkola (Eds.), Reframing humans in information systems development.

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2011 HERDC submission. FoR code: 080611

© Copyright Springer, 2011

ISBN

978-1-84996-346-6

Abstract

Extract:
The design and embedding of technical artifacts in complex task, social, and organizational environments is fundamental to IS. Yet in Design Science Research (DSR) and in the information system development process, the role of the humans who will use the system has been marginalized to that of a source in a requirements elicitation process, a subject in participatory design, or worse, a "user" of the designed technological artifact (Bannon 1991). While recent research (Kensing et al. 1998; Kensing and Blomberg 1998; Grudin and Pruitt 2002) has positioned end-users as participants involved in the design process, this work has largely focused on the primary desgin phase of technology artifacts. We have not seen a conscious, research driven approach which posits people as free, intelligent, and intentional designers in the ongoing recreation of information systems through a process of secondary design in the context of use.

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This document has been peer reviewed.