Title

Further examinations of the impact of training on emotional intelligence

Date of this Version

11-28-2008

Document Type

Conference Paper

Publication Details

Interim status: Citation only.

Murray, J. & Jordan, P. J. (2008). Further examinations of the impact of training on emotional intelligence. Paper presented at the 3rd Asia-Pacific symposium on emotions in worklife, Newcastle, Australia.

© Copyright Jane Murray & Peter Jordan, 2008

Abstract

This poster presents the results of extended analyses conducted to determine the outcomes of Emotional Intelligence (EI) training for specific groups. Using a quasi-experimental design, two training programs were conducted over 18 months in a Public Sector organisation. Results demonstrated that emotions focused training (2 1/2 days) increased participant EI, and especially their ability to discuss own emotions, awareness of others’ emotions, and ability to manage others’ emotions. Results also revealed that interpersonal skills training (1 1/2 days) increased participant EI, including their ability to discuss own emotions and ability to manage others’ emotions. No change was revealed for a control group.

While these results increase our understanding of the efficacy of training to increase EI, what is unknown is whether participants with markedly different EI scores prior to training had differing outcomes. This poster presents the results of additional analyses conducted to answer this question. Pre-training (or time 1) data from the control (n=89) and two training groups (n= 161, n= 81) were split into three categories. The first category (low EI) contained participants with EI scores in the bottom 25% of scores for their group. Moderate EI consisted of middle range (26-74%) respondent scores. High EI comprised participants with total EI scores in the top 25% of respondents. Split data from the control, emotions focussed and interpersonal skills trained groups were then analysed individually using repeated measures ANOVA.

Control group results revealed that low EI participants increased their awareness of and ability to discuss own emotions. Participants with moderate EI showed a decrease in their awareness of emotions. High EI participants demonstrated a decrease in overall EI and awareness of own emotions. Analysis of the emotions training data revealed that low EI participants experienced an increase in overall EI and all related sub-scales except awareness of emotions. Moderate EI participants increased their overall EI, ability to discuss own emotions and ability to manage others’ emotions. The high EI participants revealed a decrease in their ability to manage own emotions. Finally, the interpersonal skills group with low EI saw an increase in overall EI, awareness of own, and ability to discuss own emotions. Moderate EI participants showed no change in EI. Finally, high EI participants experienced a decrease in awareness of own emotions. Implications and future directions for research will be identified.

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