Title

Self-evaluation bias of social comparisons in ethical decision making: The impact of accountability

Date of this Version

4-1-2008

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Details

Interim status: Citation only.

Novicevic, M. M., Buckley, M. R., Harvey, M. G., & Fung, H. (2008). Self-evaluation bias of social comparisons in ethical decision making: The impact of accountability. Journal of applied social psychology, 38(4), 1061-1091.

Access the publisher's website.

2008 HERDC submission. FoR Code: 1701

© Copyright Milorad M. Novicevic, M. Ronald Buckley, Michael G. Harvey & Helen Fung, 2008.
Journal Compilation © Copyright Blackwell Publishing, Inc., 2008

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine how accountability and judgment biases that occur in social comparisons may be related to ethical decision making. Using Jones' (1991) model as the theoretical framework to investigate this phenomenon, we found that self-enhancing individuals (i.e., those who thought they were more ethical in comparison to their peers) demonstrated higher responsiveness to increases in accountability than did self-effacing individuals (i.e., those who thought they were less ethical in comparison to their peers). We discuss these findings and outline the implications for future ethics research. Further, we provide practical guidance to those who administer ethics compliance programs on effective ways of facilitating ethical behavior in organizations.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

This document has been peer reviewed.