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Abstract

All human service providers work with clients who are trans and gender diverse, intersex, and/or non-heterosexual. It will not always be apparent, or necessary, to confirm the sex, gender or sexuality of clients in order to provide services to them. If practitioners take care to avoid cisgenderism and heterosexism with all clients, then they will be taking the first steps necessary to provide a service that is welcoming and inclusive. There are some services that mediators could be particularly well equipped to offer to trans and gender diverse, intersex and/or non-heterosexual clients, including: assistance to navigate conflict around identity; informed postseparation mediation services; and assistance to negotiate family formation agreements. Some issues are experienced by clients of diverse sex, gender and sexuality with greater frequency than by other clients, and mediators need to have accurate knowledge and be able to work in an appropriately inclusive manner. Mediators should be aware of historical as well as current legal treatment of individuals, couples and families who are trans and gender diverse, intersex and/or non-heterosexual, and be alert to dynamics of power that arise as a result of legal non-recognition of certain family relationships.

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