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Abstract

[Extract] In the 1960s and 1970s, Governments and the community became aware of the need for institutional machinery to monitor the operation of the legal system and to recommend changes which would ensure that the law, while maintaining its valuable tradition, more readily accommodated changed social expectations and values. Law reform agencies were seen as the answer. They did not provide a panacea, for no single measure or institution could ever hope to address all social problems. They have been reasonably successful within the limited scope of their operations. They have also developed a range of skills and techniques which have assisted both in improving the quality of their work and in building the legitimacy of institutionalised law reform with important centres of power within the community: the public (including special interest groups), the bureaucracy and politicians.

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